books and chapters2019-11-20T22:06:53+00:00
  • Books and Chapters

Volquardsen, Ebbe. “From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo.”

From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo

During the summer months of 1932 and 1933, the 7th Thule Expedition led an international team of researchers, under Knud Rasmussen’s guidance, to Greenland’s east coast. There, the team conducted cartographic work, as well as archaeological and geological investigations. In 1921, Denmark had declared the entirety of Greenland and its surrounding waters to be Danish territory, and had since that time been in open conflict with Norway. The Norwegians, independent since 1905, regarded Greenland as their historical property, and recognised only the colonies situated on the west coast as Danish territory.

 

Reference

Volquardsen, Ebbe. “From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo.” Films on Ice, edited by Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edinburgh University Press, 2015, pp. 215–21.

Sarkisova, Oksana. “Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North.”

Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North

Early Soviet policies towards the numerically small Northern and Far Eastern indigenous populations emerged from a nineteenth-century populist framework that saw cultural extinction as a major problem (Kuper 1988: 2–3). In the early 1920s, the Soviet press frequently presented the situation of the indigenous population of the North as ‘worsening’, ‘becoming harder’, and finally reaching a ‘catastrophic’ stage (cf. Ianovich 1923: 251–4; Slezkine 1994: 131–83). Soviet nationality policy, defined by Francine Hirsch as a ‘state-sponsored evolutionism’, grounded the Soviet ‘civilizing mission’ in the Marxist concept of development through historical stages (Hirsch 2005: 7).

 

Reference

Sarkisova, Oksana. “Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North.” Films on Ice, edited by Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edinburgh University Press, 2015, pp. 222–34.

Roston, Tom. “‘We Come As Friends’, or Do We? Hubert Sauper’s New Documentary on South Sudan

We Come As Friends’, or Do We? Hubert Sauper’s New Documentary on South Sudan

We Come As Friends is about as idiosyncratic a film as I could imagine — visually stunning, lyrically composed, hilariously opinionated — meaning it may not be a smash hit at the box office when it is released in theaters this Friday, but anyone who sees it is in for the closest we’ll ever come to a hybridization of Michael Moore and the Harvard Sensory Ethnography Lab. That is never going to happen, so you have to check this out.

 

Reference

Roston, Tom. “‘We Come As Friends’, or Do We? Hubert Sauper’s New Documentary on South Sudan.” POV’s Documentary Blog, http://archive.pov.org/blog/docsoup/2015/08/we-come-as-friends-or-do-we-hubert-saupers-new-documentary-on-south-sudan/.

Nair, Kartik. “Scouting the Past: A Conversation with Priya Jaikumar on Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space.”

Scouting the Past: A Conversation with Priya Jaikumar on Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space

Kartik Nair in conversation with Priya Jaikumar about her new book, Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space.

 

Reference

Nair, Kartik. “Scouting the Past: A Conversation with Priya Jaikumar on Where Histories Reside: India as Filmed Space.” Film Quarterly, 10 Sept. 2019, https://filmquarterly.org/2019/09/10/scouting-the-past-a-conversation-with-priya-jaikumar-on-where-histories-reside-india-as-filmed-space/.

MacKenzie, Scott. “The Creative Treatment of Alterity: Nanook as the North.”

The Creative Treatment of Alterity: Nanook as the North

This chapter considers Robert Flaherty’s Nanook of the North (US, 1922) – probably the most famous Arctic film ever made – and the many, often fraught, reiterations of the film in the cinematic imaginary of the Arctic. Starting with Flaherty’s film – typically understood to be, pace John Grierson, the first ‘documentary’ – the chapter examines the ways in which the stories of ‘Nanook’ (played by Inuit hunter Allakariallak) and Flaherty have been continuously rearticulated throughout cinema history, in works as diverse as realist ethnographic documentaries like Nanook Revisited (Claude Massot, France, 1990), narrative feature film retellings of Flaherty’s filming…

 

Reference

MacKenzie, Scott. “The Creative Treatment of Alterity: Nanook as the North.” Films on Ice, edited by Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edinburgh University Press, 2015, pp. 201–14.

Larsson, Mariah, and Anna Westerstahl Stenport. “Women Arctic Explorers: in Front of and Behind the Camera.”

Women Arctic Explorers: in Front of and Behind the Camera

Cameras have been brought on expeditions to the Far North for over a century. Explorers who were also filmmakers include Anthony Fiala on the Ziegler Polar Expedition (1903–05), Donald MacMillan on the Crocker Land Expedition (1913–17), Fyodor Bremer on the Kolyma voyage to the Bering Strait, the Far East, and Kamchatka (1913–1914), and Leo Hansen as part of Knud Rasmussen’s Fifth Thule Expedition on dog sled from Greenland to Alaska (1921–24).

 

Reference

Larsson, Mariah, and Anna Westerstahl Stenport. “Women Arctic Explorers: in Front of and Behind the Camera.” Arctic Cinemas and the Documentary Ethos, edited by Anna Westerstahl Stenport et al., Indiana University Press, 2019, pp. 68–91.