ethnography2019-11-20T22:09:34+00:00
  • Ethnography

Williams, Blake. “Cannes 2018 Dispatch #1: Everybody Knows, Birds of Passage.”

Cannes 2018 Dispatch #1: Everybody Knows, Birds of Passage

One’s valuation of a film—really, any piece of art—is inseparable from the conditions in which it was experienced. The time of day or overall mood and health at the time of the screening (or link-watching) inform my appreciation of a movie just as much as anything else (save for aesthetic preference and sensibility, perhaps), and this extends to festival contexts—to the ways a film participates in the narrative arc of the nine or ten or twelve days of the event, to the impatience stemming from a lack of masterpieces (or good movies, period), and so on. I bring this up to provide some reference for why I might have been especially ill-positioned to receive my first two movies of this year’s Cannes: Asghar Farhadi’s Everybody Knows, which opened the Official Selection last night, and Cristina Gallego & Ciro Guerra’s Birds of Passage, which opened the 50th Directors’ Fortnight this morning.

 

Reference

Williams, Blake. “Cannes 2018 Dispatch #1: Everybody Knows, Birds of Passage.” Filmmaker Magazine, https://filmmakermagazine.com/105310-cannes-2018-dispatch-1-everybody-knows-birds-of-passage/.

Warpoole, Kailyn N. Visual Anthropology in Sardinia: Interview with Silvio Carta.

Visual Anthropology in Sardinia: Interview with Silvio Carta

Silvio Carta completed his PhD in Italian Studies at the University of Birmingham. His articles and reviews have appeared in Visual Anthropology, Visual Anthropology Review, Visual Studies, Visual Ethnography, and Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies, among other publications. To find out more about his book Visual Anthropology in Sardinia, Film Matters conducted a Q & A with Carta via email correspondence (June-July 2015).

 

Reference

Warpoole, Kailyn N. Visual Anthropology in Sardinia: Interview with Silvio Carta. By Kailyn N. Warpole | Film Matters Magazine. https://www.filmmattersmagazine.com/2015/09/21/visual-anthropology-in-sardinia-interview-with-silvio-carta-by-kailyn-n-warpole/.

Volquardsen, Ebbe. “From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo.”

From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo

During the summer months of 1932 and 1933, the 7th Thule Expedition led an international team of researchers, under Knud Rasmussen’s guidance, to Greenland’s east coast. There, the team conducted cartographic work, as well as archaeological and geological investigations. In 1921, Denmark had declared the entirety of Greenland and its surrounding waters to be Danish territory, and had since that time been in open conflict with Norway. The Norwegians, independent since 1905, regarded Greenland as their historical property, and recognised only the colonies situated on the west coast as Danish territory.

 

Reference

Volquardsen, Ebbe. “From Objects to Actors: Knud Rasmussen’s Ethnographic Feature Film the Wedding of Palo.” Films on Ice, edited by Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edinburgh University Press, 2015, pp. 215–21.

Stevenson, A. (2017). Arrival Stories: Using Participatory, Embodied, Sensory Ethnography to Explore the Making of an English City for Newly Arrived International Students.

Arrival Stories: Using Participatory, Embodied, Sensory Ethnography to Explore the Making of an English City for Newly Arrived International Students

Places are more than mere locations indicated by coordinates on a map. They are sites invested with meaning that arises out of mobile, embodied, sensuous experience. The construction of place is explored here in the context of participatory, embodied, sensory ethnographic research. I curated a series of ethnographic engagements with international students who were newly arrived in the city of Manchester, England. A participatory, embodied, sensory ethnographic method was used to explore ways in which meaningful places are constructed through the body and senses. This article reports on walking interviews with Tala (from Zambia), Ann (from Romania), Al (from Tunisia), Abbie (from Spain), and her guide dog Tori (from the U.S.), to explore their corporeal and sensuous engagements with their new city, using a combination of transcribed interviews and other, less language-based products of our engagements (photography, artifacts, soundscapes).

 

Reference

Stevenson, A. (2017). Arrival Stories: Using Participatory, Embodied, Sensory Ethnography to Explore the Making of an English City for Newly Arrived International Students. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 46(5), 544-572.

Sarkisova, Oksana. “Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North.”

Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North

Early Soviet policies towards the numerically small Northern and Far Eastern indigenous populations emerged from a nineteenth-century populist framework that saw cultural extinction as a major problem (Kuper 1988: 2–3). In the early 1920s, the Soviet press frequently presented the situation of the indigenous population of the North as ‘worsening’, ‘becoming harder’, and finally reaching a ‘catastrophic’ stage (cf. Ianovich 1923: 251–4; Slezkine 1994: 131–83). Soviet nationality policy, defined by Francine Hirsch as a ‘state-sponsored evolutionism’, grounded the Soviet ‘civilizing mission’ in the Marxist concept of development through historical stages (Hirsch 2005: 7).

 

Reference

Sarkisova, Oksana. “Arctic Travelogues: Conquering the Soviet North.” Films on Ice, edited by Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerståhl Stenport, Edinburgh University Press, 2015, pp. 222–34.

Sanderud, J. (2018). Mutual Experiences: Understanding Children’s Play in Nature Through Sensory Ethnography.

Mutual Experiences: Understanding Children’s Play in Nature Through Sensory Ethnography

This paper introduces the concept ‘mutual experiences’ to highlight how a researcher’s sensory experiences may contribute to producing knowledge concerning children’s bodily play in a natural environment. The article also demonstrates how photo-interviews can give a researcher virtual access to places and events where s/he cannot be present. The inspiration for the concept of ‘mutual experiences’ emerged from three sources: (1) The premise that human experiences and knowledge are embodied and develop interactively from environments, (2) the literature on sensory ethnography and (3) ethnographically inspired studies of children playing in a natural environment. The concept is illustrated through an analysis of empirical examples. It is argued that applying this concept could contribute to a more open, enriched and intersubjective understanding of children’s interactive play in a natural environment. Article ahead-of-print.

 

Reference

Sanderud, J. (2018). Mutual Experiences: Understanding Children’s Play in Nature Through Sensory Ethnography. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 1-12.